February 6, 2021

A quick review of Christian anthropology reminds us that a human person is the marriage of intellect and will within a physical body.  Our intellects process sensory experiences through our bodiliness, while our wills take our bodies to the next right place.  The goal of the Christian life, thus, is to at last present our bodies, fully and unreservedly, to our Father in heaven, exclaiming with the Son, “This is my body!” (Mt 26:26).  Nevertheless, we know all too well how, when the reality of sin enters into the picture and gums up the works, our intellects and wills break down and our bodies do not end up where they are supposed to be, and instead we either become stuck or get into trouble.  Let us therefore be people who make the commitment to live like Jesus, people who spend time in prayer with the Father, who aren’t afraid to be led into the desert, who speak the truth, who see others through the eyes of compassion, who suffer for what is just, who accept the many trials and crosses that the Lord offers to us.  In this way, indeed, our thinking and choosing will function as a finely-tuned machine, and our bodies will arrive at last in the heavenly Jerusalem where we will make an offering of our whole selves to the Father forever.  Ave Crux, Spes Unica!

4 thoughts on “February 6, 2021

  1. I work at this everyday of my life. But what is the correct response when you are compassionate toward some one day in and day out and they just think you a liar? Kick the dust off your sandals when our peace is no longer there? Discipleship is at times so difficult when total detachment is required.

  2. I work at this everyday of my life. But what is the correct response when you are compassionate toward some one day in and day out and they just think you a liar? Kick the dust off your sandals when our peace is no longer there? Discipleship is at times so difficult when total detachment is required.
    Jeff Heinz

    1. You are so correct, brother, detachment is key to the Christian life (didn’t we have a reading this week about not taking an extra tunic or gold or silver for the journey?). My experience is that sometimes what happens is that our own vulnerabilities and neediness gets wrapped up in someone else’s under the pretense of love or service or friendship or ministry. The work of detachment not only helps us to see another clearly, but ourselves as well. The engagement that comes out of that kind of objectivity is what makes authentic love possible (it is always self-disinterested and self-giving). This detachment, however, is only possible in the deep deep deep security of the Father’s love, which is why of course Jesus pairs love of neighbor (seeing others clearly and knowing them well) specifically and non-negotiably with love of God (intimacy with the Father)

      1. Thanks for clarifying. Sometimes we know these truths but it sure is nice when we receive confirmation.

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